OFFLINE ( documentary about the lack of internet in Cuba)

“For a Cuba Online”

About the human right to information, and by extension the Internet access is “Offline”, last documentary independently realized with my team.

We sought to investigate during the creative process in the state of disconnectedness-misinformation that live most citizens in Cuba. A controversial state over the global and rampant development of information technology and communications.

From exploring the features of this phenomenon in my country, official review about historical discourse and dialogue with artists and intellectuals, recreate the “evolution” of the scrawny Cuban network.

For Offline we also consulted some of those who substantially use digital media to express their ideas within the island and Cubans in their usual travel on the streets.

So we formed an opinion document that relates subjective criteria needs on technological literacy and democratic access to information, rarely present in the national media.

In order to generate controversy we organized our alternatives (Switch on) in communities of interest, to our peril.

Could we with this project stimulate the transformation of the situation?

What principles underpin the urgency of a new order?

Cuba lanza un plan para dar acceso a internet en los hogares

Cuba lanza un plan para dar acceso a internet en los hogares
En la capital cubana empezarán a operar este año otras 30 zonas wifi para acceder a Internet desde espacios públicos, según el anuncio. Rodríguez sostuvo que también en el futuro se planea ofrecer un acceso a Internet a cafeterías, bares y restaurantes …
Read more on Clarín.com

La Televisión Cubana emite una noticia falsa
En Cubadebate se desmiente una noticia que fuera emitida en el Noticiero de la Televisión Cubana y otros medios como Telesur, sobre la inhabilitación en Argentina por parte del nuevo gobierno de Macri de médicos del país sudamericano graduados en …
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Cuba’s really terrible internet, explained

A few years ago some computer gamers based in Havana strung a small web of ethernet cables, from house to house, so they could play video games together. The network has grown quietly and today its called StreetNet: a bootleg internet for Havana with over 10,000 users. It was an innovation forged by necessity in a country where only 5 percent of the citizens have access to the uncensored internet. Watch the why Cuba’s internet is stuck in 1995.

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Cuba has some of the worst internet access in the world, with just 5 percent of Cubans able to access the uncensored web.

Since the communist revolution of 1959, the Castro regime has enforced a strict ban on all forms of information flow that challenge official policy and history. Enforcing such censorship has been relatively easy for an island nation that has a monopoly over all media outlets. But when the internet arrived in the ’90s, it complicated matters for the Castro’s.

As Cubans get a taste for the wonder that is the internet, they want more. As internal pressure grows, the Cuban regime will likely continue to find creative ways to offer the internet without losing control of the flow of information. The opening of Cuba to foreign investment and travel will only speed up the process.

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This is Cuba’s Netflix, Hulu, and Spotify – all without the internet

Media smugglers get Taylor Swift, Game of Thrones, and the New York Times to Cubans every week through an illegal network of runners.

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In Cuba there is barely any internet. Anything but the state-run TV channels is prohibited. Publications are limited to the state-approved newspapers and magazines. This is the law. But, in typical Cuban fashion, the law doesn’t stop a vast underground system of entertainment and news media distributors and consumers.

“El Paquete Semanal” (The Weekly Package) is a weekly trove of digital content—everything from American movies to PDFs of Spanish newspapers—that is gathered, organized and transferred by a human web of runners and dealers to the entire country. It is a prodigious and profitable operation.

I went behind the scenes in Havana to film how the Paquete works. Check out the video above to see how Cubans bypass censorship to access the media we take for granted.

Read full post at http://www.vox.com/2015/9/21/9352095/netflix-cuba-paquete-internet

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o