Sh!t Q’Ban Girls Say Vol.I

This is typical shit Cuban girls say. If you live in Miami you know it’s true.

Cuban Girl explains what “Bandz” is in our new video “Special Love Dedication”
http://supercommercial.power96.com/ Don’t forget to VOTE.

GIRL GETS NAKED - SEXY CUBAN GIRL TWERKING - @redroselacubana

SUBSCRIBE ==== http://goo.gl/P2u0F1

Follow us on Facebook === www.facebook.com/twerkvidsforyou

Enjoy and subscribe for more vids each week!

Beautiful Cuban girls

SEDUCTORAS DE CUBA – CUBAN REGGAETON HITS 2015! CUBATON GIRLS!
TWERK 2015 – ZUMBA 2015 – REGGAETON 2015 – DEMBOW 2015 – KUDURO 2015 – SALSA 2015 – BACHATA 2015 – MERENGUE 2015!
SEXY LANTINA WOMAN FROM CUBA ARE DANCING REGGAETON AND PERREO! SEXY EROTIC CUBAN GIRLS BAILAN REGGAETON CUBANO! REGGAETON CUBANO HITS 2015! SEXY LATINAS BAILAN REGGAETON & PERREO

Chacal Y Yakarta – Besito Con Lengua
Osmani Garcia – Flotando Miami
Los 4 – Ella Me Pide
Los Desiguales, El Micha, Gente De Zona and much more.

CUBA SEX AND EROTIC ► SEXY CUBAN GIRLS BAILAN CUBAN REGGAETON & PERREO 2015 EN LA CALLE DE CUBA!

► TWERK 2015, Salsa 2015, Bachata 2015, Reggaeton 2015, Kuduro 2015,Latin Club Hits 2015, Merengue 2015, Mambo, Cubaton 2015, Electro, House, Pop

SEDUCTORAS DE CUBA – CUBAN REGGAETON HITS 2015! CUBATON GIRLS!
TWERK 2015 – ZUMBA 2015 – REGGAETON 2015 – DEMBOW 2015 – KUDURO 2015 – SALSA 2015 – BACHATA 2015 – MERENGUE 2015!
SEXY LANTINA WOMAN FROM CUBA ARE DANCING REGGAETON AND PERREO! SEXY EROTIC CUBAN GIRLS BAILAN REGGAETON CUBANO! REGGAETON CUBANO HITS 2015! SEXY LATINAS BAILAN REGGAETON & PERREO

Chacal Y Yakarta – Besito Con Lengua
Osmani Garcia – Flotando Miami
Los 4 – Ella Me Pide
Los Desiguales, El Micha, Gente De Zona and much more.

► The biggest hits of Chacal Y Yakarta (Los exitos de Chacal Y Yakarta):
– La Corrupcion
– Raka Raka
– El Toca Toca
– Linda
– Cuentale De Mi
– Pa Las Mujeres Que Estan Activa
– Sexo
– Masi
– Soy Un Descarao
– Hilo Dental
– Mentiras Tuyas
– El Dueno De Tu Cama
– Mi Vitamina Tu Olor
– Ellas son Locas
– Algo Contigo
– Luna (Bachata)
– No Te Vayas (Bachata)
– Nunca Te Apartes De Mi (Bachata)
– La Bendicion
– Besito Con Lengua
– El Tubazo
– El Blumer
– Mas Tembleque
– El Bikini

LOS EXITOS DE OSMANI GARCIA
– El Chupi Chupi
– El Taxi
– Miami Chiling
– Playa de dia y por noche discoteca
– El Mecanico
– El Condon Se me va la musa
– Sacame La Lenguita
– Estoy pa Dartela
– El Amiguito El Pipi
– Hacer El Amo
– Ella Es mia
– Agua
– La Malcria
– La Bodeguera
– Flotando Miami
– Culeala
– El Gol

► LOS EXITOS DE LOS 4 (Jorge Junior)
– Tu De Que Vas
– Dimelo
– Ella Me Pide
– Pa Que Bailen
– Dicen Por Ahi
– Te Vas
– Recoge Que Te Vas
– Me Entere
– Como Hay Locos
– Pafata
– Calentico
– Fula Cantidad
– Como Tu Inflas
– Solo Vistete
– Pensando En Ti
– Llamame
– Que Bien Me Va
– Tu Tienes Que saber
– Lo Que Quiero Es
– Confiesame
– Si se va a formar que se forme
– Ahora como te mantienes
– Fresa Y Chocolate
– El oro es mio
– Quitate Tu Pa Ponerme Yo
– Tu No Te Gobiernas
– Pasaporte

URBAN LATIN & DANCE TV ► OFFICIAL LATIN VIDEO HIT MIX ! ► FULL STREAMING !!!

Urban Latin/Dance Records, the sucessfull independent label a division of KIWI Distributions & Publishing GmbH. With more than 250 signed artists worldwide, one of the most powerfull independent LATIN label with more than 500’000 sold CDs and nearly 100 CD releases a year! We have more than 20 years of music and distribution experience. URBAN LATIN/DANCE RECORDS has developed a music publishing and licensing platform to maximize the value of the copyrights. URBAN LATIN/DANCE RECORDS owns the worldwide licensing and publishing rights for most of the artists. URBAN LATIN/DANCE RECORDS offers licenses for compilations, commercial productions, films and television. URBAN LATIN/DANCE RECORDS gives a worldwide presence to songs and uses the same high energy in a way that only independents can!
► Billboard End Year Charts 2013: Urban Latin Records is No.4 of the most important Latin Label !

► URBAN LATIN RECORDS most important artists :
Angeles De La Bachata, B&V, Nando Pro, Blad MC, Candyman, Chacal Y Yakarta, El Chacal, Chocolate MC, Clon Latino, Crossfire, DpuntoD, Los Desiguales, DJ Papi Electric, Don Latino, Dr. Bellido, El Yonki, El Medico, El Unico, Eminencia Clasica, Este Habana, Gente De Zona, Grupo Extra, Haila, Insurrecto, Jacob Forever, Jessee Suarez, Kola Loka, Lucenzo, Lady E, Los Presidentez, La Sociedad, LKM, Los 4, Los Jefes, Miss EvElyn, Osmani Garcia, Principes De La Bachata, Senor Bachata, Silega Y Joe, Vilsy, Yandar Y Yostin, Yulien Ovideo and much more

► URBAN DANCE RECORDS most important artists:
Ark, Pitbull, Silver925, Kaira, Snoop Lion, Funkstar Deluxe Feat. Kim Wilde, Jessi Malay, Teodora Sima, Just Ivy Ft. Akon, Robert Reamzy, Sir Lewis and much more

Urban Latin/Dance Records has a special and strong network in music business. A lot of millions fans and followers in social networks, a big pool with more than 5000 Latin DJ worldwide, cooperation with a lot of radio music stations, CNN and MTV Latin in Miami. Urban Latin Records is very good conected with the Latin Fitness and Workout business with the most important companies. Beside that we are working very strong in cooperation with other Feat. Artists. In past with Juan Magan, Pitbull, J. Alvarez and others. (Perhaps very soon with artists like Don Omar, Romero Santos, Daddy Yankee or Prince Royce.)

Cool Cuban Girls images

A few nice cuban girls images I found:

More Cuba, Dec 2011 – 054
cuban girls
Image by Ed Yourdon
Another view of the statue and church in the Plaza de San Francisco. One of the photos in my initial set of Havana pix (URL provided below) shows the birds in flight…

This is a second set of a couple hundred photos taken in Havana, Cuba in December 2011. The first set, which included what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images, was uploaded earlier. You can find it here on Flickr.

***********************

As I suggested in my first set of Cuba photos on Flickr, the notion of traveling to Cuba is — at least for many Americans today — probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.

And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I fully expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (lots of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s, Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings and cars, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

Havana Street – Mar 2014 – Yes, We Have No Bananas
cuban girls
Image by gareth1953 Cataract Creating Chaos
Fruit and Veg seller on a Havana street with little to sell but a lot to say to a beautiful young customer. What I like most about this picture is the fact that you can’t tell which is the girl’s legs and which is the the trolley’s leg.
The title refers to a popular Music Hall (Vaudeville) song of the early Twentieth Century. I will attach a You Tube clip of it later.
Here is an unusual setting for the song but any excuse to show a clip of Audrey Hepburn will do. wn.com/audrey_hepburn_yes,_we_have_no_bananas

Behind another door in Havana
cuban girls
Image by Rene Bastiaanssen
Behind another door in Havana

Cool Cuban Girls images

Check out these cuban girls images:

Park & Die
cuban girls
Image by The James Kendall
I’ve got no idea what the graffiti here means (if anyone could tell me i’d be really grateful) but i want it to say something like Park & Die or something.

Nikon F100, something crossproccessed, perhaps elitechrome

Cuba
cuban girls
Image by Neil. Moralee
Well the restaurant is called "The Cuban" but its in Bristol in the UK.
——————————–
The food is good but you need to be patient; very patient.
A few lessons in organisational management might help a bit.

If you have plenty of time and nothing else to do its a nice place to try.

www.thecubanbristol.co.uk/

100 views of Cuba, Dec 2011 – 98
cuban girls
Image by Ed Yourdon
This set consists of what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images that I took in Cuba during a weeklong visit in December 2011.

Note: this photo was published in a Feb 14, 2013 Buzzine blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written here on this Flickr page.

Moving into 2014, the photo was published in a Mar 5, 2014 blog titled "Conoce cómo son los uniformes escolares alrededor del mundo."

***********************

Cuba. For today’s generation of Americans, the notion of traveling to Cuba is probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.

And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I full expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (LOTS of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s, Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

CUBA HABANA MALECON BEST PARTY FIESTA NIGHT GIRLS LIVE SEX CHICAS

SEE — VEA TAMBIEN ——

Video Rating: / 5

CUBA 2015 Documental, trips and travels to Cuba from USA . How to travel Havana. Real Cuba, nature and music. Salsa in old Havana
http://www.photographingcuba.com
Viajes, videos, ideas y actividades para tu viaje en tus vacaciones a Cuba. Foto Tours por toda Cuba. Que hacer en La Habana, Santiago, Trinidad, Viñales, Baracoa, Varadero, etc.
Musica cubana y salsa.
Travels to Cuba. Trips to Havana, Varadero, Viñales, Trinidad, Santiago de Cuba, etc…
El video tiene muy buena salsa cubana, y pretende ser una ayuda y una inspiración para tus vacaciones.
Hoteles, playas y los mejores lugares de Cuba.
The best hotels and beaches in Cuba.
Video Rating: / 5

Cool Cuban Girls images

Check out these cuban girls images:

Ciber Cafe
cuban girls
Image by larskflem
We found a door inside a hotel with a misspelled sign saying "Ciber Cafe". Behind the door we found one computer. Email-time.

little girls
cuban girls
Image by by Ophelia photos
So sweet, the little girls allowed me and a friend we met from America to take a few shots, they were just adorable!

BEAUTIFUL GIRLS on the beach SANTA LUCIA CAMAGUEY CUBA

girls on the beach santa lucia camaguey cuba

Playa Mégano is a wonderful beach, east of Havana. I lived in Havana and spent many days in Playa Mégano in January and February 2008. It took about half an hour to go to the beach by taxi. Every day a beach band played there and the feeling was very relaxed. Yes, when I filmed this video I zoomed too much on that gilr’s bottom and I’m sorry about that. I never do it again! I guess Cuba got hold on me. Please watch also my other video Girls have fun in Istanbul. – Walter de Camp
Video Rating: / 5