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Should Us Men move to Brazil for Good?: Passport Kings Travel Video

Should Us Men move to Brazil for Good?: Passport Kings Travel Video

Welcome to another Passport Kings Episode:

Sponsor: www.passportkings.com/contact-us &
www.facebook.com/groups/AfroAmericanMenAfroBrazilianWomen/

Today I interview Charles Tyler from the famous Facebook Group Afro-American Men Afro Brazilian Women and also from the show called “Living off the grid”. He says that black men should be getting ready to move out of The Matrix and into Brazil to find love, Marriage and Respect from our African Brazilian counterparts. This is only part of this excellent interview that we had on Skype. The entire interview will be emailed to you when you sign up to the passport kings mailing list located at passportkings.com/contact-us. Should Black Men be moving to Brazil for good? See what my guest thinks in this exciting video and make that call for yourself. Here is the part of the story that the mainstream does not want you to hear!

My name is Roklan. I’m a published author, director, editor, Certified Travel Agent and the creator of passport kings. Each week I will give you advice about traveling in General. Check me out every Wednesday on Youtube or keep up with me with the links below.

PassPort Kings Website: WWW.PASSPORTKINGS.COM
Passport Kings on Facebook: www.facebook.com/passportkings
BM Travel Abroad Group: http://adf.ly/1ErcKj
Subscribe Passport Kings YouTube Channel: http://adf.ly/1Ercrn
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Passport Kings on InstaGram: http://adf.ly/1Erls4

Thanks for checking me out. Welcome Aboard, Abroad!

U.S. to Restore Commercial Air Travel to Cuba

U.S. to Restore Commercial Air Travel to Cuba

Fancy smoking a real Cuban cigar–legally? The U.S. government will announce Tuesday that it has signed an agreement with Cuba to restore commercial air travel between the two countries. According to the notice sent by the Department of Transportation to congressional offices, the arrangement “establishes scheduled air service of up to 30 daily direct flights between the U.S. and Cuba, will facilitate authorized travel, enhanced traveler choices, and strengthen people-to-people links between the two countries,” According to media reports, the agreement allows for 20 flights between the U.S. and Havana, and 10 flights to nine other Cuban airports.

http://www.politico.com/story/2016/02/us-cuba-commercial-flights-219211

Home

This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Video Rating: / 5

CUBA TRAVEL: U.S. and Cuba Flights Set To Increase Daily

ANNAPOLIS: A new agreement allowing direct travel between the U.S. and Cuba could mean a boost business for one area travel agency.

Cuba travel 2016 Cuban family

Cuba travel 2016 Cuban family
Cool kids, great dad and comforting mum
Cubans are great folks
Video Rating: / 5

Experience Cuba with Fathom – Travel Like an Architect™

http://book-a-cruise.info/cruise-to-cuba For mindful travelers, Fathom offers a truly historic opportunity: a chance to help build new bridges to a rich and vibrant culture that, until now, hasn’t been open to U.S. travelers by sea for more than 50 years.

Fathom is proud to be among the first cruise ship companies to be granted U.S. approval for round-trip travel between the U.S. and multiple destinations in Cuba, including Havana, Cienfuegos, and Santiago de Cuba. Our intention is to create the kind of true cultural immersion experience that will give you and your fellow travelers the rare chance to learn more about the lives and aspirations of the Cuban people.

Fathom cruise itineraries to Cuba are authorized under current people-to-people guidelines as set forth by the U.S. government, which allow travel to Cuba for the purpose of engaging in activities that support the Cuban people. As a Fathom traveler, you’ll have the opportunity to interact, one on one, with the artists, musicians, small-business owners, students, health workers and others who make up the fabric of Cuban society. And you’ll quickly realize that what you could learn from them is every bit as important as what they could learn from you.

Your own itinerary might include a walking tour of Havana’s Old City, a UNESCO World Heritage site. A visit to an organic farm. A meal at a home-based restaurant. An English workshop with students at a local primary school. A brainstorming and idea-sharing session with local microentrepreneurs. A chance to interact with local artists and musicians in their own environment, as you deepen your understanding of the arts as a vital bridge between people and cultures.

Is Is Legal To Travel To Cuba photos

Check out these is is legal to travel to cuba images:

More Cuba, Dec 2011 – 099
is is legal to travel to cuba
Image by Ed Yourdon
On our third day in Havana, we continued to see one old car after another. I couldn’t help photographing them all…

This is a second set of a couple hundred photos taken in Havana, Cuba in December 2011. The first set, which included what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images, was uploaded earlier. You can find it here on Flickr.

***********************

As I suggested in my first set of Cuba photos on Flickr, the notion of traveling to Cuba is — at least for many Americans today — probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.

And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I fully expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (lots of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s, Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings and cars, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

More Cuba, Dec 2011 – 102
is is legal to travel to cuba
Image by Ed Yourdon
On our third day in Havana, we continued to see one old car after another. I couldn’t help photographing them all…

This is a second set of a couple hundred photos taken in Havana, Cuba in December 2011. The first set, which included what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images, was uploaded earlier. You can find it here on Flickr.

***********************

As I suggested in my first set of Cuba photos on Flickr, the notion of traveling to Cuba is — at least for many Americans today — probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.

And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I fully expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (lots of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s, Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings and cars, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

More Cuba, Dec 2011 – 008
is is legal to travel to cuba
Image by Ed Yourdon
This is a second set of a couple hundred photos taken in Havana, Cuba in December 2011. The first set, which included what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images, was uploaded earlier. You can find it here on Flickr

Another fabulous old car, though this one doesn’t look particularly American in style …

We were told that the color of the license plate tells what basic category the car falls into. In particular, a yellow license plate means that the car is being used as a taxi.

***********************

As I suggested in my first set of Cuba photos on Flickr, the notion of traveling to Cuba is — at least for many Americans today — probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.

And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I fully expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (lots of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s, Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings and cars, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

Cuba Travel Documentary photos

Check out these cuba travel documentary images:

#cuban #diaries #cuba #travel #documentary #streetphotography #chevy #trinidad #fujix10
cuba travel documentary
Image by Liquid Oh

#cuban #diaries #cuba #travel #documentary #streetphotography #sanctispiritus
cuba travel documentary
Image by Liquid Oh

Cuba Travel Biography photos

Check out these cuba travel biography images:

Image from page 754 of “North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]” (1894)
cuba travel biography
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: northcarolinachr46unit
Title: North Carolina Christian advocate [serial]
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference
Subjects: United Methodist Church (U.S.). North Carolina Conference United Methodist Church (U.S.). Western North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Greensboro, N.C., Methodist Board of Publication, [etc.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
WEBSTERS INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY WEBSTERS INTERNATIONAL I A Dictionary of English,Biography .Geography.Ficiion,etc. NEW EDITION. 25,000 ^7j,7iU. Prepared under the direct supervision of W. T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D., UnitedStates Commissioner of Education, assisted by a large corps of competent specialists.New Plates Throughout. Rich Bindings. 2364 Pages. 5000 Illustrations. y^.1.. An Ideal Christmas Present Tvir,a^ive Renable – Lasting Also Websters Collegiate Dictionary with a valuable Scottish Glossary, etc. First class in quality, second class in size. Nicholas Murray Butler. – •!.:~~ ■■*cf~*S$tcim^:pa%esi etc., of both books sent on application. ~ G. &. C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, Springfield, Mass., U. S. A.

Text Appearing After Image:
CHURCHES: Lighted by the FRINIC. System of Patent;Reflectors. Send dimens ons forEstim ate. ••me wh ther • IT& «c i % Jjf iiil Vearl s>t. . „),.,• ij . B» » *i*c-5:4» SKVTOUK, K. —THE—eeleyInstitute, For the Core of the Liquor, Opium. Cocaine and otheidrug addictions, Nervona Ex-haustion, and the To-bacco Habit. The most attractive and Beautifully lcoateaBeeley Institute in the country. Write tor their illustrated hand-booK, THBNEW MAN. Address THB KEELS Y INSTITUTE GBBBNSBOBO, H. C. Opening of Winter Tourist Season. The Southern Railway, which operatesits own lines over the entire South andforms the important link in the greathighway of travel between the North andSouth, Florida, Cuba, Mexico, the Paci-fic Coast and Central America, announ-ces for the winter of 1901 and 1902 themost superb service ever offered. Itssplendid regular service will be augment-ed by the Southern Palm Limited, amagnificent Pullman train, which will beoperated between New York and Sa

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 611 of “The Worcester of eighteen hundred and ninety-eight. Fifty years a city” (1899)
cuba travel biography
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: worcesterofeight00ricefra
Title: The Worcester of eighteen hundred and ninety-eight. Fifty years a city
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Rice, Franklin P. (Franklin Pierce), 1852-1919, ed
Subjects: Worcester (Mass.) — Description and travel Worcester (Mass.) — Biography
Publisher: Worcester, Mass., F. S. Blanchard & company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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logy, andpursued the study of architecture in various architects offices in New Yorkand Worcester. In 1862-1863 he served eleven months in the Union army.He was draughtsman at the Hoosac Tunnel for one year, and in 1865-1866spent seven months in Europe in improving himself in his profession. Heopened an office as an architect in Worcester in 1866, and soon after wasjoined by James E. Fuller, with whom he was in partnership ten years,under the firm name of Earle & Fuller. From 1876 to 1891 Mr. Earle wasalone; and then with Clellan W. Fisher established the firm of Earle &Fisher, which still continues. From 1872 to 1885 Slv. Earle had a Bostonoffice as well as one in Worcester. Mr. Earle has designed a large number of private as well as many nota-ble public buildings, among them All Saints. St. Matthews, St. Marks,Central, Pilgrim, South Unitarian and Union churches, the new Free PublicLibrary, the Polytechnic buildings and the Art Museum in Worcester; 6io The Worcester of 1898.

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STEPHEN C. EARLE. Slater ^k-miirial huildinj;, Noi^wich; IowaCollege Library; Goodnow Hall for theHuguenot Seminary in South Africa ; andmany others. He is a member of theAmerican Institute of Architects, and ofthe Worcester Chapter of the institute.He is president of the Worcester Coopera-tive Bank, and is a member of the Quinsig-aniond Boat Club, the Episcopal ChurchClub, the Art Society and the Grand Armyof the Republic. In ])olitics Mr. Earle is a Republicananil in religion an Episcopalian, and hasheld arii>us offices in All Saints and St.Johns churches, and is miw senior wardenof the latter. Mr. Earle married in 1869 Mary L.Brown, dauohter of Albert and MaryEaton Brown, late of Worcester, and they have five children: Charles B.,graduate of Harvard University in 1894; Ralph, a graduate of the UnitedStates Naval Academy, and now in the service of his country near Cuba;Richard B., a graduate of the Worcester Polytechnic School; Ruth S., andlulward. Timothy Keese Earle.* The name

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Being an Artist in Cuba – Travel Basecamp – Havana & Varadero – Ep 5/6

http://travelbasecamp.com
Visiting the Taller Experimental de Gráfica, San Ignacio (Experimental workshop of Graph) gave the basecampers a deep understanding of the life of an artist in Cuba, the kinds of support they get from the govt and where they get their inspiration from.
While touring the facility and chatting with the different artists they learned about the printmaking processes that are unique to this facility and stumbled into some genuine masterpieces and true craftsmanship.
Although the artists didn’t divulge much about local inspiration but there was obvious political commentary in much of the work…

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Basecamp is a reality documentary series about a bunch of friends travelling around the world seeking alternative experiences in popular travel destinations. Booking stereotypical resort packages for the logistics and security, we then bust off the grounds and interact with locals to find the best adventures possible. – See more at: http://www.travelbasecamp.com/en/why-basecamping


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