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I’VE BEEN SITTING HERE ALL DAY …
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Image by mrbill78636
… feeling like I need to apologize to someone.

The year is around 1939-40. The place is an Island in the Caribbean. The man on the right is a successful artist who has quit painting and now does abstract steel sculpture. He has just learned his son who went to Canada and joined the RAF has been killed.

The man on the left is his mate on his fishing boat. He comes up, sits down by the sculptor and asks if he can bring him something to eat, reminding him he hasn’t eaten all day.

The sculptor answers, "I’ve been sitting here all day, feeling like I need to apologize to someone." That’s one of Ernest Hemingway’s great all time lines. The novel and the movie are called Islands in the Stream.

This from Wikipedia:

Islands in the Stream (1970) was the first of Ernest Hemingway’s novels to be published posthumously.

The book was originally intended to revive Hemingway’s reputation after the negative reviews of Across the River and Into the Trees. He began writing it in 1950 and advanced greatly through 1951. The work, rough but seemingly finished, was found by Mary Hemingway from among 332 different works Hemingway left behind after his death.

Islands in the Stream was meant to encompass three stories to illustrate different stages in the life of its main character, Thomas Hudson. The three different parts of the novel were originally to be entitled "The Sea When Young", "The Sea When Absent" and "The Sea in Being". These titles were changed, however, into what are now its three acts: "Bimini", "Cuba", and "At Sea".

Plot

The first act, "Bimini", begins with an introduction to the character of Thomas Hudson, a classic Hemingway stoic male figure. Hudson is a renowned American painter who finds tranquility on the island of Bimini, in the Bahamas, a far cry from his usual adventurous lifestyle. Hudson’s strict routine of work is interrupted when his three sons arrive for the summer and is the setting for most of the act. Also introduced in this act is the character of Roger Davis, one of Hudson’s oldest friends. Though similar to Hudson, by struggling with an unmentioned internal conflict, Davis seems to act as a more dynamic and outgoing image of Hudson’s character. The act ends with Hudson receiving news of the death of his two youngest children soon after they leave the island.

"Cuba" takes place soon thereafter during the second World War, where we are introduced to an older and more distant Hudson who has just received news of his oldest (and last) son’s death in the war. This second act introduces us to a more cynical and introverted Hudson who spends his days on the island drinking heavily and doing naval reconnaissance for the US Army.

"At Sea", the final act, ends leaving the reader to assume Hudson dies after being wounded in a shoot out which capped a pursuit (by him and a team of irregulars) of German sailors whose U-boat was presumably sunk in the Gulf Stream, although the ending is slightly ambiguous. Hudson becomes intent on finding the fleeing Germans after he finds they massacred an entire village to cover their escape. In this last act Hudson stops questioning the death of his children. This chapter rings heavily with influences of Hemingway’s earlier work For Whom the Bell Tolls.

Fourth Act: The Old Man and the Sea
While writing the novel Ernest Hemingway wrote a fourth part that did not seem to go with the other acts of the book. The fourth act dealt with a Cuban fisherman and was not about the rich American artist. It was this fourth part that seemed to intrigue Hemingway most as he decided to separate this act and make it into its own published work. This novella became “The Old Man and the Sea”, published in 1952, which earned Ernest Hemingway international acclaim and one of the books which earned him his Nobel Prize in 1954. Echoes of this work can still be found in Islands in the Stream within the tale of young David Hudson’s five hour struggle to capture a large fish which strongly resembles the struggle of "The Old Man and the Sea".

Saharan Dust Reaches the Americas (NASA, International Space Station, 07/15/12)
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Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Saharan dust reaching the Americas is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 32 crew member on the International Space Station. Weather satellites frequently document major dust palls blowing from the Sahara Desert westward from Africa out into the tropical Atlantic Ocean. Space station crew members frequently see these Saharan dust masses as very widespread atmospheric haze. Dust palls blowing from Africa can be transported right across the Atlantic Ocean. It takes about a week to reach either North America (in northern hemisphere summer) or South America (in northern hemisphere winter). This puts the Caribbean basin on the receiving end of many of these events. Recently, researchers have linked Saharan dust to coral disease, allergic reactions in humans, and red tides. The margin of the hazy air in this image reaches as far as Haiti (top center) and the nearby Turks and Caicos Islands (top left) — but the eastern tip of Cuba in the foreground remains in the clear air.

Image credit: NASA/JSC

Original image:
spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-32/html/…

More about space station research:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

There’s a Flickr group about Space Station Research. Please feel welcome to join! www.flickr.com/groups/stationscience/

View more than 400 photos like this in the "NASA Earth Images" Flickr photoset:
www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/

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These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

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Dedication to the Great Victory Day. Soviet Self Propelled Tank Destroer SU-100. 1944-45. Ко дню Великой Победы. Советская Самоходка СУ-100.
Cuba Culture
Image by Peer.Gynt
Moscow. Technical Museum of Vadim Zadorozhny.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7ghaMEy0l8

The SU-100 was a Soviet casemate-style tank destroyer. It was used extensively during the last year of World War II and saw service for many years afterwards with the armies of Soviet allies around the world.
It was developed in 1944 as an improvement to the SU-85, built on the same chassis as the T-34-85 tank. It was designed and built at the UZTM (Russian abbreviature УЗТМ for Уральский Завод Тяжелого Машиностроения – Ural Heavy Machinery Factory, also called Uralmash) in Yekaterinburg. The SU-100 quickly proved itself to be among the best self-propelled anti-tank guns of World War II, able to penetrate 125 mm (4.9 in) of vertical armor from a range of 2,000 m (1.2 mi) and the sloped 85 mm (3.3 in) front armor of the German Panther from 1,500 m (0.93 mi).[citation needed] The development was conducted under supervision of L. I. Gorlitskiy, chief designer of all medium Soviet self-propelled guns. The work started in February 1944 and first prototype of SU-100, called "Object 138", was built in March. After intensive testing with different models of 100 mm gun Soviet engineers approved the D-10S gun for mass production. This gun was developed in Constructors Bureau of Artillery Factory No. 9 under guidance of F. F. Petrov. After the Second World War it was installed on T-54 and T-55 tanks and its derivatives were in service forty years after initial development. The hull of SU-100 had major improvements over the SU-85; the thickness of the front armour was increased from 45 to 75 mm (1.8 to 3.0 in), and the commander’s workplace was made in a small sponson on the right side of the hull; combined with the commander’s cupola this greatly improved the commander’s effectiveness. For better ventilation two ventilator units were installed, instead of only one as in the SU-85. Mass production began in September 1944.
The SU-100 saw extensive service during the last year of the war. It was used en masse in Hungary in March 1945, when Soviet forces defeated the German Operation Frühlingserwachen offensive at Lake Balaton. By July 1945, 2,335 SU-100s had been built.

The vehicle remained in service with the Red Army well after the war; production continued in the Soviet Union until 1947 and into the 1950s in Czechoslovakia. It was withdrawn from Soviet service in 1957 but many vehicles were transferred to reserve stocks. Some exist to this day in the Russian Army holding facilities.

Many Warsaw Pact countries also used the SU-100, as did Soviet allies such as Egypt, Angola and Cuba. A few SU-100 were delivered to Yugoslavia after the war, under the designation M-44.[1] The SU-100 saw service in the fighting that accompanied the 1956 Suez Crisis, in which the Egyptians used SU-100s against Israel’s M4 Sherman tanks. The vehicle was also utilized in the 1967 Six-Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War. It was modified slightly to adapt it to the sandy conditions of the Middle East, thus creating the SU-100M variant. Exported SU-100s continued in service until the 1970s, and in some countries, even later. Yugoslavs used them during the civil war however due to lack of spare parts they were quickly retired, but performed satisfactorily. The SU-100 remains in use by the Vietnam People’s Army and the Korean People’s Army Ground Force despite the age of the design.

SU-100s entered service with the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) of China after 1 December 1950 when Soviet forces left Dalian. The armaments in Dalian were sold to China, including 99 SU-100s, 18 IS-2 heavy tanks, 16 T-54s and 224 T-34s, with which PLA formed its 1st Mechanised Division.
In popular culture [edit]

The crew of a World War II SU-100 and their vehicle are the heroes of the old Soviet film «На войне как на войне» Na vojne kak na vojne ("All’s fair in love and war" (literally: "In wartime it’s like wartime"), one of several Soviet films made about self-propelled artillery men. Veterans of the German-Soviet War found this picture quite realistic. The movie includes a Soviet tankmen song, which is popular with both Russian armoured soldiers and civilians.
A SU-100 is used by the protagonists in the movie The Misfit Brigade, where it is portrayed as a German tank, possibly because it resembles the Jagdpanzer 38 (t) tank destroyer and the Jagdpanther. Ironically, the film has a scene where the Germans spot one, supposedly captured by the Russians, and proclaim: "That’s one of ours! It sure is, and it’s a terrible paint job. You can still see the cross! … Ivan’s pinched my tank!" The film is also known as Wheels of Terror, based on the book by Sven Hassel.

Central Florida 1957
Cuba Culture
Image by davecito
Map by Rand McNally: insets on reverse for Tampa, Miami, Cuba and the SE US. As late as 1957, Miami, Jacksonville and Tampa were the only Florida cities with populations over 100,000; though the state was a strong tourist magnet, the overwhelming majority of the state was still rural, and still very Southern in culture.

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Tommy’s Garden | 1
Cuba Documentaries
Image by myles.tan
The garden of Tommy’s house/museum/restaurant. Tommy’s story is told in a documentary by Tora Martens, found here.

We were walking by Tommy’s house as he was picking herbs and flowers from a street vendor. A character that’s hard to miss, we ended up wandering into his house, which is a beautiful mix of ornament and china covered walls, lush garden, and elegant dining space.

Stopping by Tommy’s, taking in the atmosphere, and hearing his story is definitely a highlight of Havana. Something a place I will be spending more time upon my return.

Havana, Cuba.

#cuban #diaries #cuba #travel #documentary #streetphotography #sanctispiritus
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Image by Liquid Oh

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SAM S-75 Dvina. ЗРК С-75 “Двина”
Cuba history
Image by Peer.Gynt
Saint-Petersburg. Artillery Museum.

The S-75 Dvina (Russian: С-75; NATO reporting name SA-2 Guideline) is a Soviet-designed, high-altitude, command guided, surface-to-air missile (SAM). Since its first deployment in 1957 it has become the most widely-deployed air defense missile in history. It scored the first destruction of an enemy aircraft by a SAM, shooting down a Taiwanese Martin RB-57D Canberra over China, on October 7, 1959 by hitting it with three V-750 (1D) missiles at an altitude of 20 km (65,600 ft). The success was attributed to Chinese fighters at the time in order to keep the S-75 program secret.
This system first gained international fame when an S-75 battery, using the newer, longer-range and higher-altitude V-750VN (13D) missile shot down the U-2 of Francis Gary Powers overflying the Soviet Union on May 1, 1960.[3] The system was also deployed in Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, where on October 27, 1962, it shot down the U-2 flown by Rudolf Anderson, almost precipitating nuclear war.[4] North Vietnamese forces used the S-75 extensively during the Vietnam War to defend Hanoi and Haiphong. It has also been locally produced in the People’s Republic of China using the names HQ-1 and HQ-2. Other nations have produced so many local variants combining portions of the S-75 system with both indigenously-developed components or third-party systems that it has become virtually impossible to find a pure S-75 system today,
Development
In the early 1950s, the United States Air Force rapidly accelerated its development of long-range jet bombers carrying nuclear weapons. The USAF program led to the deployment of Boeing B-47 Stratojet supported by aerial refueling aircraft to extend its range deep into the Soviet Union. The USAF quickly followed the B-47 with the development of the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, which had greater range and payload than the B-47. The range, speed, and payload of these U.S. bombers posed a significant threat to the Soviet Union in the event of a war between the two countries.
onsequently, the Soviets initiated the development of improved air defense systems. Although the Soviet Air Defence Forces had large numbers of anti-aircraft artillery (AAA), including radar-directed batteries, the limitations of guns versus high-altitude jet bombers was obvious. Therefore, the Soviet Air Defense Forces began the development of missile systems to replace the World War II-vintage gun defenses.
In 1953, KB-2 began the development of what became the S-75 under the direction of Pyotr Grushin. This program focused on producing a missile which could bring down a large, non-maneuvering, high-altitude aircraft. As such it did not need to be highly maneuverable, merely fast and able to resist aircraft counter-measures. For such a pioneering system, development proceeded rapidly, and testing began a few years later. In 1957, the wider public first became aware of the S-75 when the missile was shown at that year’s May Day parade in Moscow.
Initial deployment
Wide-scale deployment started in 1957, with various upgrades following over the next few years. The S-75 was never meant to replace the S-25 Berkut surface-to-air missile sites around Moscow, but it did replace high-altitude anti-aircraft guns, such as the 130 mm KS-30 and 100 mm KS-19. Between mid-1958 and 1964, U.S. intelligence assets located more than 600 S-75 sites in the USSR. These sites tended to cluster around population centers, industrial complexes, and government control centers. A ring of sites was also located around likely bomber routes into the Soviet heartland. By the mid-1960s, the Soviet Union had ended the deployment of the S-75 with perhaps 1,000 operational sites.
In addition to the Soviet Union, several S-75 batteries were deployed during the 1960s in East Germany to protect Soviet forces stationed in that country. Later the system was sold to most Warsaw Pact countries and was provided to China, North Korea, and eventually, North Vietnam.
Employment
While the shooting down of Francis Gary Powers’ U-2 in 1960 is the first publicized success for the S-75, the first aircraft actually shot down by the S-75 was a Taiwanese Martin RB-57D Canberra high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft. In this case, the aircraft was hit by a Chinese-operated S-75 site near Beijing on October 7, 1959. Over the next few years, the Taiwanese ROCAF would lose a number of aircraft to the S-75: both RB-57s and various drones. On May 1, 1960, Gary Powers’s U-2 was shot down while flying over the testing site near Sverdlovsk, although it is thought to have taken 14 missiles to hit his high-flying plane. That action led to the U-2 Crisis of 1960. Additionally, Chinese S-75s downed five ROCAF-piloted U-2s based in Taiwan.[5]
During the Cuban Missile Crisis, a U-2 piloted by USAF Major Rudolf Anderson was shot down over Cuba by an S-75 in October 1962.[6]
In 1965, North Vietnam asked for some assistance against American airpower, for their own air-defense system lacked the ability to shoot down aircraft flying at high altitude. After some discussion it was agreed to supply the PAVN with the S-75. The decision was not made lightly, because it greatly increased the chances that one would fall into US hands for study. Site preparation started early in the year, and the US detected the program almost immediately on April 5, 1965. While military planners pressed for the sites to be attacked before they could become operational, their political leaders refused, fearing that Soviet technical staff might be killed.
On July 24, 1965, a USAF F-4C aircraft was shot down by an SA-2.[7] Three days later, the US responded with Operation Iron Hand to attack the other sites before they could become operational. Most of the S-75 were deployed around the Hanoi-Haiphong area and were off-limits to attack (as were local airfields) for political reasons. President Lyndon Johnson announced on public TV that one of the other sites would be attacked the next week. The Vietnamese removed the missiles and replaced them with decoys, while moving every available anti-aircraft gun into the approach routes. The tactic worked, causing heavy American casualties.
The missile system was used widely throughout the world, especially in the Middle East, where Egypt and Syria used them to defend against the Israeli Air Force, with the air defense net accounting for the majority of the downed Israeli aircraft. The last apparent success seems to have occurred during the War in Abkhazia (1992–1993), when Georgian missiles shot down a Russian Sukhoi Su-27 fighter near Gudauta on March 19, 1993.
Countermeasures and counter-countermeasures
Between 1965 and 1966, the US delivered a number of solutions to the S-75 problem. The Navy soon had the Shrike missile in service and mounted their first offensive strike on a site in October 1965. The Air Force responded by fitting B-66 bombers with powerful jammers (that blinded the early warning radars) and by developing smaller jamming pods for fighters (that denied range information to the radars). Later developments included the Wild Weasel aircraft, which were fitted with anti-radiation air-to-surface missile systems made to home in on the radar from the threat. This freed them to shoot the sites with Shrikes of their own.
The Soviets and Vietnamese, however, were able to adapt to some of these tactics. The USSR upgraded the radar several times to improve ECM (electronic counter measure) resistance. They also introduced a passive guidance mode, whereby the missile could lock on the jammer itself. This had an added advantage, because the radar had to be turned off, which prevented Shrikes from being fired. Moreover, some new tactics were developed to combat the Shrike. One of them was to point the radar to the side and then turn it off briefly. Since the Shrike was a relatively primitive anti-radiation missile, it would follow the beam away from the radar and then simply crash when it lost the signal (after the radar was turned off). Another was a "false launch" in which the tracking radar was turned on, but the missiles were not actually fired. This allowed the missile crew to see if the target was equipped with a Shrike. If the aircraft fired one, the Shrike could be neutralized with the side-pointing technique without sacrificing any S-75s.
Despite these advances, the US was able to come up with effective ECM packages for the B-52E models. These planes were able to fly raids against Hanoi with relatively few losses (though still significant enough to cause some concern; see Operation Linebacker II).
Replacement systems
Soviet Air Defence Forces started to replace the S-75 with the vastly superior SA-10 and SA-12 systems in the 1980s. Today only a few hundred, if any, of the 4,600 missiles are still in Russian service, even though they underwent a modernization program as late as 1993.[citation needed]
The S-75 remains in widespread service throughout the world, with some level of operational ability in 35 countries. Vietnam and Egypt are tied for the largest deployments at 280 missiles each, while North Korea has 270, and Poland has 240. The Chinese also deploy the HQ-2, an upgrade of the S-75, in relatively large numbers.
Soviet doctrinal organization
The Soviet Union used a fairly standard organizational structure for S-75 units. Other countries that have employed the S-75 may have modified this structure. Typically, the S-75 is organized into a regimental structure with three subordinate battalions. The regimental headquarters will control the early-warning radars and coordinate battalion actions. The battalions will contain several batteries with their associated acquisition and targeting radars.
Site layout
Each battalion will typically have six, semi-fixed, single-rail launchers for their V-750 missiles positioned approximately 60 to 100 m (200 to 330 ft) apart from each other in a hexagonal "flower" pattern, with radars and guidance systems placed in the center. It was this unique "flower" shape that led to the sites being easily recognizable in reconnaissance photos. Typically another six missiles are stored on tractor-trailers near the center of the site.
An example of a site can be seen here just to the west of the junction to Bosra on the M5 motorway in Syria, south of Damascus. This location covers the borders with both Israel and Jordan, so it is of strategic importance.
Missile
V-750

V-750V 1D missile on a launcher
TypeSurface-to-air missile
Place of origin Soviet Union
Production history
VariantsV-750, V-750V, V-750VK, V-750VN, V-750M, V-750SM, V-750AK
Specifications (V-750[9])
Weight2,300 kg (5,100 lb)
Length10,600 mm (420 in)
Diameter700 mm (28 in)
WarheadFrag-HE
Warhead weight200 kg (440 lb)
Detonation
mechanismCommand
PropellantSolid-fuel booster and a storable liquid-fuel upper stage
Operational
range45 km (28 mi)
Flight altitude20,000 m (66,000 ft)
Boost time5 s boost, then 20 s sustain
SpeedMach 3.5
Guidance
systemRadio control guidance
Accuracy65 m
Launch
platformSingle rail, ground mounted (not mobile)
The V-750 is a two-stage missile consisting of a solid-fuel booster and a storable liquid-fuel upper stage, which burns red fuming nitric acid as the oxidizer and kerosene as the fuel. The booster fires for about 4–5 seconds and the main engine for about 22 seconds, by which time the missile is traveling at about Mach 3. The booster mounts four large, cropped-delta wing fins that have small control surfaces in their trailing edges to control roll. The upper stage has smaller cropped-deltas near the middle of the airframe, with a smaller set of control surfaces at the extreme rear and (in most models) much smaller fins on the nose.
The missiles are guided using radio control signals (sent on one of three channels) from the guidance computers at the site. The earlier S-75 models received their commands via two sets of four small antennas in front of the forward fins, while the D model and later models used four much larger strip antennas running between the forward and middle fins. The guidance system at an S-75 site can handle only one target at a time, but it can direct three missiles against it. Additional missiles could be fired against the same target after one or more missiles of the first salvo had completed their run, freeing the radio channel.
The missile typically mounts a 195 kg (430 lb) fragmentation warhead, with proximity, contact, and command fusing. The warhead has a lethal radius of about 65 m (213 ft) at lower altitudes, but at higher altitudes the thinner atmosphere allows for a wider radius of up to 250 m (820 ft). The missile itself is accurate to about 75 m (246 ft), which explains why two were typically fired in a salvo. One version, the SA-2E, mounted a 295 kg (650 lb) nuclear warhead of an estimated 15 Kiloton yield or a conventional warhead of similar weight.
Typical range for the missile is about 45 km (28 mi), with a maximum altitude around 20,000 m (66,000 ft). The radar and guidance system imposed a fairly long short-range cutoff of about 500 to 1,000 m (1,600 to 3,300 ft), making them fairly safe for engagements at low level.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S-75_Dvina

Image from page 253 of “Our native birds of song and beauty, being a complete history of all the songbirds, flycatchers, hummingbirds, swifts, goatsuckers, woodpeckers, kingfishers, trogons, cuckoos, and parrots, of North America” (1893)
Cuba history
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924084820277
Title: Our native birds of song and beauty, being a complete history of all the songbirds, flycatchers, hummingbirds, swifts, goatsuckers, woodpeckers, kingfishers, trogons, cuckoos, and parrots, of North America
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Nehrling, Henry 1853-1929
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Milwaukee, G. Brumder
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Text Appearing Before Image:
re-quently raised in confinement by Dr. Karl Russ and other bird-lovers. These tiny birds ofan olive-green color, with velvety black throat, cheeks, and face, and with a broad yellowcollar round the black throat, are extremely lively in the cage, but they are veritablegame-roosters if several are kept together. They live quite well on Canary and milletseeds in winter, but need a diet like the Indigo Bunting in spring and summer. Theybuild a beautiful globular nest with a small entrance on the side. Like the small Africanand Australian Finches the pair frequently sits together even in the nest. The four,rarely five eggs, are grayish, or greenish-white, minutely dotted and blotched withgreen, dark and light brown. The young birds leave the nest very early and whenscarcely fledged. The Cuba Finch or Melodious Grassquit is known in the eastern part of Cubaunder the name of Senserenico and in the western part, according to Dr. J. Gundlach,Tome guin del Pinor is its common name. Tafel XXVII

Text Appearing After Image:
SPIZA AMERICANA RIDGW. S C H I LD AM MER.D i c l< c i s s e 1. DICKCISSEL. Spiza americatia Ridgway. Plate XXYII. BURING the month of April and May the plain, monotonous prairie west andnorth-west of Houston, Texas, offers a magnificent sight. As far as the eye canreach, the grassy savanna is covered with a carpet of highly colored flowers. Phloxes,verbenas^ lark-spurs, crowfoots, gaillardias*, coreopsis^ and many other flowersimpart these rich prairies with a beauty peculiarly their own. Everywhere we find theprostrate, very prickly stems of the mimosa or sensitive plant*, the rosy-purplishflower-balls of which exhale a delicate honey-like fragrance. The leaves of this interestingplant are very sensitive, bending, folding, and apparently shrinking away from the touchof the hand. Pure white, deliciously scented spider-lilies grow and flower abundantlyin the black soil, and blue-eyed grass and the pretty nemastylis® are also found infavorable places. Yuccas and opuntias, the latter

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