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Che Guevara – Speech about voluntary labour www.TanvirOnline.co.cc

Ernesto “Che” Guevara (June 14,[1] 1928 October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, El Che, or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, politician, author, physician, military theorist, and guerrilla leader. After death, his stylized image became a ubiquitous countercultural symbol worldwide.

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As a young medical student, Guevara traveled throughout Latin America and was transformed by the endemic poverty he witnessed. His experiences and observations during these trips led him to conclude that the region’s ingrained economic inequalities were an intrinsic result of monopoly capitalism, neocolonialism, and imperialism, with the only remedy being world revolution. This belief prompted his involvement in Guatemala’s social reforms under President Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán, whose eventual CIA-assisted overthrow solidified Guevara’s radical ideology.

Later, in Mexico, he met Fidel Castro and joined his 26th of July Movement. In December 1956, he was among the revolutionaries who invaded Cuba under Castro’s leadership with the intention of overthrowing U.S.-backed Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. Guevara soon rose to prominence among the insurgents, was promoted to Comandante, and played a pivotal role in the successful two year guerrilla campaign that deposed Batista.[4] Following the Cuban revolution, Guevara reviewed the appeals of those convicted as war criminals during the revolutionary tribunals, ratifying sentences which in some cases utilized firing squads.[5] Later he served as minister of industry and president of the national bank, before traversing the globe as a diplomat to meet an array of world leaders on behalf of Cuban socialism. He was a prolific writer and diarist, composing a seminal manual on the theory and practice of guerrilla warfare, along with an acclaimed memoir about his motorcycle journey across South America. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to incite revolutions first in an unsuccessful attempt in Congo-Kinshasa and later in Bolivia, where he was captured with the help of the CIA and executed.

Both notorious as a ruthless disciplinarian who unhesitatingly shot defectors and revered by supporters for his rigid dedication to professed doctrines, Guevara remains a controversial and significant historical figure. As a result of his perceived martyrdom, poetic invocations for class struggle, and desire to create the consciousness of a “new man” driven by “moral” rather than “material” incentives,[6] Guevara evolved into a quintessential icon of leftist-inspired movements. Paradoxically and in contradiction with his ideology, Che’s visage was also reconstituted as a global marketing emblem and insignia within popular culture. He has been mostly venerated and occasionally reviled in a multitude of biographies, memoirs, books, essays, documentaries, songs, and films. Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century,[7] while an Alberto Korda photograph of him entitled Guerrillero Heroico (shown), was declared “the most famous photograph in the world.”[8]

“The first thing to note is that in my son’s veins flowed the blood of the Irish rebels, the Spanish conquistadores and the Argentinean patriots. Evidently Che inherited some of the features of our restless ancestors. There was something in his nature which drew him to distant wanderings, dangerous adventures and new ideas.”
— Ernesto Guevara Lynch, Che’s Father

Che Guevara – Viva El Che (by Ramon Goose)

Che Guevara, byname of Ernesto Guevara de la Serna (born June 14, 1928, Rosario, Argentina—died October 1967, Bolivia), theoretician and tactician of guerrilla warfare, prominent communist figure in the Cuban Revolution (1956–59), and later guerrilla leader in South America. After his execution by the Bolivian army, he was regarded as a martyred hero by generations of leftists worldwide, and his image became an icon of leftist radicalism and anti-imperialism.

Guevara was the eldest of five children in a middle-class family of Spanish-Irish descent and leftist leanings. Although suffering from asthma, he excelled as an athlete and a scholar, completing his medical studies in 1953. He spent many of his holidays traveling in Latin America, and his observations of the great poverty of the masses convinced him that the only solution lay in violent revolution. He came to look upon Latin America not as a collection of separate nations but as a cultural and economic entity, the liberation of which would require an intercontinental strategy.

In 1953 Guevara went to Guatemala, where Jacobo Arbenz headed a progressive regime that was attempting to bring about a social revolution. (Around this time Guevara acquired his nickname, from a verbal mannerism of Argentines who punctuate their speech with the interjection che.) The overthrow of the Arbenz regime in 1954 in a coup supported by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency persuaded Guevara that the United States would always oppose progressive leftist governments. This conviction became the cornerstone of his plans to bring about socialism by means of a worldwide revolution.

He left Guatemala for Mexico, where he met the Cuban brothers Fidel and Raúl Castro, political exiles who were preparing an attempt to overthrow the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista in Cuba. Guevara joined Fidel Castro’s force, which landed in the Cuban province of Oriente late in November 1956. Immediately detected by Batista’s army, they were almost wiped out; the few survivors, including the wounded Guevara, reached the Sierra Maestra, where they became the nucleus of a guerrilla army. The rebels slowly gained in strength, seizing weapons from Batista’s forces and winning support and new recruits, and Guevara became one of Castro’s most-trusted aides. Guevara recorded the two years spent overthrowing Batista’s government in Pasajes de la guerra revolucionaria (1963; Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War, 1968).

After Castro’s victorious troops entered Havana on Jan. 2, 1959, and established a Marxist government, Guevara became a Cuban citizen, as prominent in the new government as he had been in the revolutionary army, representing Cuba on many commercial missions. He also became well known in the West for his opposition to all forms of imperialism and neocolonialism and for his attacks on U.S. foreign policy. He served as chief of the Industrial Department of the National Institute of Agrarian Reform, president of the National Bank of Cuba, and minister of industry.

During the early 1960s, he defined Cuba’s policies and his own views in many speeches and writings, notably “”El socialismo y el hombre en Cuba”” (1965; “”Man and Socialism in Cuba,”” 1967)—an examination of Cuba’s new brand of communism—and a highly influential manual, La guerra de guerrillas (1960; Guerrilla Warfare, 1961). After April 1965 Guevara dropped out of public life. His movements and whereabouts for the next two years remained secret; it was later learned that he had spent some time in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo with other Cuban guerrilla fighters, helping to organize the Patrice Lumumba Battalion, which fought in the civil war there.

In the autumn of 1966 Guevara went to Bolivia, incognito, to create and lead a guerrilla group in the region of Santa Cruz. On Oct. 8, 1967, the group was almost annihilated by a special detachment of the Bolivian army. Guevara, who was wounded in the attack, was captured and shot. Yet Guevara would live on as a powerful symbol, bigger in some ways in death than in life. He was almost always referenced simply as Che—like Elvis Presley, so popular an icon that his first name alone was identifier enough. Guevara’s romanticized image as a revolutionary loomed especially large for the generation of young leftist radicals in western Europe and North America in the turbulent 1960s. Almost from the time of his death, Guevara’s whiskered face—framed by a beret and long hair—has adorned T-shirts, initially as a statement of rebellion, then as the epitome of radical chic, and, with the passage of time, as a kind of abstract logo whose original significance may even have been lost on its wearer.
Andrew Annandale Sinclair

Song credits:

“Che Guevara”
Written by Ramon Goose
Produced by Ramon Goose

Gear used: Free The Tone SOV-2 pedal and Free The Tone Cables, Mystic Blues Amp by Custom by Cougar
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Red History of Che Guevara | khalid bin anis news

Che – Maasranga TV news
Ernesto “Che” Guevara born June 14, 1928 – October 9, 1967, commonly known as el Che or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion and global insignia in popular culture.

As a young medical student, Guevara traveled throughout South America and was radicalized by the poverty, hunger, and disease he witnessed. His burgeoning desire to help overturn what he saw as the capitalist exploitation of Latin America by the United States prompted his involvement in Guatemala’s social reforms under President Jacobo Árbenz, whose eventual CIA-assisted overthrow at the behest of the United Fruit Company solidified Guevara’s political ideology. Later, in Mexico City, he met Raúl and Fidel Castro, joined their 26th of July Movement, and sailed to Cuba aboard the yacht Granma, with the intention of overthrowing U.S.-backed Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. Guevara soon rose to prominence among the insurgents, was promoted to second-in-command, and played a pivotal role in the victorious two-year guerrilla campaign that deposed the Batista regime.

Following the Cuban Revolution, Guevara performed a number of key roles in the new government. These included reviewing the appeals and firing squads for those convicted as war criminals during the revolutionary tribunals, instituting agrarian land reform as minister of industries, helping spearhead a successful nationwide literacy campaign, serving as both national bank president and instructional director for Cuba’s armed forces, and traversing the globe as a diplomat on behalf of Cuban socialism. Such positions also allowed him to play a central role in training the militia forces who repelled the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing the Soviet nuclear-armed ballistic missiles to Cuba which precipitated the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.Additionally, he was a prolific writer and diarist, composing a seminal manual on guerrilla warfare, along with a best-selling memoir about his youthful continental motorcycle journey. His experiences and studying of Marxism–Leninism led him to posit that the Third World’s underdevelopment and dependence was an intrinsic result of imperialism, neocolonialism, and monopoly capitalism, with the only remedy being proletarian internationalism and world revolution. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to foment revolution abroad, first unsuccessfully in Congo-Kinshasa and later in Bolivia, where he was captured by CIA-assisted Bolivian forces and summarily executed.

Guevara remains both a revered and reviled historical figure, polarized in the collective imagination in a multitude of biographies, memoirs, essays, documentaries, songs, and films. As a result of his perceived martyrdom, poetic invocations for class struggle, and desire to create the consciousness of a “new man” driven by moral rather than material incentives, he has evolved into a quintessential icon of various leftist-inspired movements. Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century,[15] while an Alberto Korda photograph of him, titled Guerrillero Heroico (shown), was cited by the Maryland Institute College of Art as “the most famous photograph in the world”.
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=cKHE_OpWiXY
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Che Guevara

Che Guevara

Che Guevara

/From Wikipedia/

Ernesto “Che” Guevara;[7] June 14,[1] 1928 – October 9, 1967), commonly known as el Che or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion and global insignia in popular culture.[8]
As a young medical student, Guevara traveled throughout South America and was radicalized by the poverty, hunger, and disease he witnessed.[9] His burgeoning desire to help overturn what he saw as the capitalist exploitation of Latin America by the United States prompted his involvement in Guatemala’s social reforms under President Jacobo Árbenz, whose eventual CIA-assisted overthrow at the behest of the United Fruit Company solidified Guevara’s political ideology.[9] Later, in Mexico City, he met Raúl and Fidel Castro, joined their 26th of July Movement, and sailed to Cuba aboard the yacht, Granma, with the intention of overthrowing U.S.-backed Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista.[10] Guevara soon rose to prominence among the insurgents, was promoted to second-in-command, and played a pivotal role in the victorious two-year guerrilla campaign that deposed the Batista regime.[11]
Following the Cuban Revolution, Guevara performed a number of key roles in the new government. These included reviewing the appeals and firing squads for those convicted as war criminals during the revolutionary tribunals,[12] instituting agrarian land reform as minister of industries, helping spearhead a successful nationwide literacy campaign, serving as both national bank president and instructional director for Cuba’s armed forces, and traversing the globe as a diplomat on behalf of Cuban socialism. Such positions also allowed him to play a central role in training the militia forces who repelled the Bay of Pigs Invasion[13] and bringing the Soviet nuclear-armed ballistic missiles to Cuba which precipitated the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.[14] Additionally, he was a prolific writer and diarist, composing a seminal manual on guerrilla warfare, along with a best-selling memoir about his youthful continental motorcycle journey. His experiences and studying of Marxism–Leninism led him to posit that the Third World’s underdevelopment and dependence was an intrinsic result of imperialism, neocolonialism, and monopoly capitalism, with the only remedy being proletarian internationalism and world revolution.[15][16] Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to foment revolution abroad, first unsuccessfully in Congo-Kinshasa and later in Bolivia, where he was captured by CIA-assisted Bolivian forces and summarily executed.[17]
Guevara remains both a revered and reviled historical figure, polarized in the collective imagination in a multitude of biographies, memoirs, essays, documentaries, songs, and films. As a result of his perceived martyrdom, poetic invocations for class struggle, and desire to create the consciousness of a “new man” driven by moral rather than material incentives, he has evolved into a quintessential icon of various leftist-inspired movements. Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century,[18] while an Alberto Korda photograph of him, titled Guerrillero Heroico (shown), was cited by the Maryland Institute College of Art as “the most famous photograph in the world”.[19]
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Hasta Siempre Comandante Che Guevara song guajira Cuban Musicians in Santa Lucia Cuba

Hasta Siempre Comandante, written by Carlos Puebla, is about Che Guevara, a Marxist revolutionary who served as a military advisor to Fidel Castro and helped Castro overthrow the Batista government. Che Guevara is a political and cultural icon in Cuba. He died in 1967 during an attempted revolution in Bolivia.

Aquí se queda la clara
La entrañable transparencia
De tu querida presencia
Comandante Che Guevara

Jorge and Luis Peña Acosta, Los Hermanos Peña, are professional musicians from Cuba. They have performed in Europe many times and they worked for four years in Spain in Palma de Mallorca. They perform regularly at the Brisas Santa Lucia in Camaguey, Cuba and Canadians and Europeans return yearly to see these personable and talented performers. Jorge and Luis love their music, culture, and country, but they welcome invitations to perform internationally. For more information, please contact jpenaacosta@gmail.com.

Che Guevara – The Revolutioner of Cuba

CHE GUEVARA:
Ernesto “Che” Guevara (June 14, 1928 — October 9, 1967), commonly known as el Che or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion and global insignia in popular culture.

As a young medical student, Guevara traveled throughout South America and was radicalized by the poverty, hunger, and disease he witnessed.[9] His burgeoning desire to help overturn what he saw as the capitalist exploitation of Latin America by the United States prompted his involvement in Guatemala’s social reforms under President Jacobo Árbenz, whose eventual CIA-assisted overthrow at the behest of the United Fruit Company solidified Guevara’s political ideology. Later, in Mexico City, he met Raúl and Fidel Castro, joined their 26th of July Movement, and sailed to Cuba aboard the yacht, Granma, with the intention of overthrowing U.S.-backed Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista. Guevara soon rose to prominence among the insurgents, was promoted to second-in-command, and played a pivotal role in the victorious two-year guerrilla campaign that deposed the Batista regime.

Following the Cuban Revolution, Guevara performed a number of key roles in the new government. These included reviewing the appeals and firing squads for those convicted as war criminals during the revolutionary tribunals, instituting agrarian land reform as minister of industries, helping spearhead a successful nationwide literacy campaign, serving as both national bank president and instructional director for Cuba’s armed forces, and traversing the globe as a diplomat on behalf of Cuban socialism. Such positions also allowed him to play a central role in training the militia forces who repelled the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing the Soviet nuclear-armed ballistic missiles to Cuba which precipitated the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. Additionally, he was a prolific writer and diarist, composing a seminal manual on guerrilla warfare, along with a best-selling memoir about his youthful continental motorcycle journey. His experiences and studying of Marxism–Leninism led him to posit that the Third World’s underdevelopment and dependence was an intrinsic result of imperialism, neocolonialism, and monopoly capitalism, with the only remedy being proletarian internationalism and world revolution. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to foment revolution abroad, first unsuccessfully in Congo-Kinshasa and later in Bolivia, where he was captured by CIA-assisted Bolivian forces and summarily executed.

Guevara remains both a revered and reviled historical figure, polarized in the collective imagination in a multitude of biographies, memoirs, essays, documentaries, songs, and films. As a result of his perceived martyrdom, poetic invocations for class struggle, and desire to create the consciousness of a “new man” driven by moral rather than material incentives, he has evolved into a quintessential icon of various leftist-inspired movements. Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century, while an Alberto Korda photograph of him, titled Guerrillero Heroico (shown), was cited by the Maryland Institute College of Art as “the most famous photograph in the world”.
For More Detail Click Here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Che_Guevara

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INFORMATION SOURCE: “WIKIPEDIA”
LINK: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Che_Guevara

Cuban Travel - Jimmy Sommers Travels to Cuban Jazz Festival with Marysol Travel Cuba

http://www.particularcuba.com — http://www.marysoltravel.com — The 28th annual Jazz Plaza International Festival took place December 20-23, 2012 in Havana Cuba. For 28 years now, the world’s most renowned jazz artists have come together to celebrate jazz music in the capitol of Cuba. This year, the Jazz Festival in Havana featured Jimmy Sommers saxophonist as a special guest.

During the Festival, Jimmy Sommers first performed in the “La Zorra y el Cuervo” Jazz Club, followed by another act in the Havana Jazz Café, and a Jam Section in Hotel Melia Cohiba where he jammed with Cuban celebrities like Oscar Valdes, co-founder of the Irakere and lead musician of the Diákara band, as well as Jorge Luis Pacheco, Alejandro Falcón y Cubadentro, Achy Lam y Afrocuba, Carlos Averfoff and Wil Campa. Jimmy Sommers’ visit to Cuba and his jazz performance was one of the top news stories in Cuba as evidenced by a featured cover announcement in the Cuban Daily newspaper Granma.
Jimmy Sommers’ travel and performance was organized and arranged by Marysol Travel Cuba, one of the few foreign-owned travel agencies offering full service Incoming Tour Operator services in Cuba. “We were very pleased to work with Jimmy arranging his trip. We are most proud of being able to organize his performances with Oscar Valdes and other famous jazz musicians. We also organized sightseeing trips for him where he learned more about the history of Cuba and its people.” said Tamas Nagy, sales director of Marysol Travel.
“Marysol Travel did an excellent job putting my trip together. They paid attention to every detail and made my stay in Cuba comfortable and memorable. It was a truly unique experience” commented Jimmy Sommers.
Travel to Cuba is now becoming a reality not only for celebrities but also for all US citizens. Licensed travel is now available, and US citizens can travel to Cuba legally under a license of the OFAC. Marysol Travel Cuba offers quality special-interest programs to Cuba, such as Eco & Nature trips, educational travel, architectural tours, art travel, photo travel, cultural and artistic events, conferences and festivals. All these trips are in line with the current US travel policy to Cuba, providing a great opportunity for US citizens to explore the culture and people of Cuba legally.

For more information about travel to Cuba:
MARYSOL TRAVEL CUBA
Website: http://www.particularcuba.com;http:// www.cubanaturetravel.com; http://www.cubaluxuryrent.com
Corporate website: http://www.marysoltravel.com
E-mail: info@marysoltravel.com
Tel: 1- 941-306-3990 / US
+53 5 263 1786 / Cuba

Death Secrets – Ernesto Che Guevara, Cuban Revolutionary leader – Che

Death secrets is a special program by V6 about the death mysteries of famous and prominent personalities across the world.

Ernesto “Che” Guevara commonly known as el Che or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous counter-culture symbol of rebellion and global insignia in popular culture.

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Che Guevara: Biography, Cuban Revolution, Early Life, Family, Death (1997)

Appearances of Argentine Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara (1928–1967) in popular culture are common throughout the world. Although during his lifetime he …

Che Guevara: Biography, Cuban Revolution, Early Life, Family, Death (1997)

Che Guevara: Biography, Cuban Revolution, Early Life, Family, Death (1997)

Che Guevara: Biography, Cuban Revolution, Early Life, Family, Death (1997)

Appearances of Argentine Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara (1928–1967) in popular culture are common throughout the world. Although during his lifetime he was a highly politicized and controversial figure, in death his stylized image has been transformed into a worldwide emblem for an array of causes, representing a complex mesh of sometimes conflicting narratives. Che Guevara’s image is viewed as everything from an inspirational icon of revolution, to a retro and vintage logo. Most commonly he is represented by a facial caricature originally by Irish artist Jim Fitzpatrick and based on Alberto Korda’s famous 1960 photograph titled Guerrillero Heroico. The evocative simulacra abbreviation of the photographic portrait allowed for easy reproduction and instant recognizability across various uses. For many around the world, Che has become a generic symbol of the underdog, the idealist, the iconoclast, or the man willing to die for a cause. He has become, as author Michael Casey notes in Che’s Afterlife: The Legacy of an Image, “the quintessential postmodern icon signifying anything to anyone and everything to everyone.”

Actors who have portrayed Che Guevara:

Francisco Rabal in El Che Guevara (1968)
Omar Sharif in Che! (1969)
Michael Palin in Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982)
Antonio Banderas in Evita (1996)
Miguel Ruiz Días in El Che (1997)
Alfredo Vasco in Hasta la Victoria Siempre (1999)
Gael García Bernal in Fidel (2002)
Karl Sheils in Meeting Che Guevara & the Man from Maybury Hill (2003)
Gael García Bernal in The Motorcycle Diaries (2004)
Jsu Garcia in The Lost City (2005)
Martin Hyder in The Mark Steel Lectures: Che Guevara (2006)
Sam G. Preston in The True Story of Che Guevara (2007)
Eduardo Noriega in Che (2007)
Benicio del Toro in Che (2008)

In the 1998 film Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Johnny Depp depicting Hunter S. Thompson awakens from an adrenochrome overdose and stands in front of a picture of Che Guevara stuck to a Mexican flag. Benicio del Toro who co starred in the film (and would later play Che Guevara in Che), has stated that Thompson kept a “big” picture of Che in his kitchen.[49]
In the 2003 documentary Breakfast with Hunter, acclaimed author Hunter S. Thompson can be seen in several scenes wearing different Che Guevara t-shirts.
Actress Lindsay Lohan dons a Che Guevara t-shirt in one scene of the 2004 film Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen.[50]
Indian actor Rajat Kapoor was made up to resemble Guevara in the 2009 Bollywood thriller Siddharth-The Prisoner. In describing the reasoning, director Pryas Gupta stated that the central concept of the film is “freedom from the complexities of life” while remarking “who better than Che Guevara, to represent that spirit.”[51]
James Benning utilizes Richard Dindo’s documentary Ernesto Che Guevara: The Bolivian Diaries to form his own 1997 avant-garde film titled Utopia. The film juxtaposes Che’s vehement opposition to imperialism, with the importing of low wage Mexican laborers in the California desert to farm the Imperial Valley.[52]
The 1983 Yugoslavian film Kako sam Sistematski Uništen od Idiota (How I Was Systematically Destroyed by an Idiot), directed and co-written by Slobodan Šijan, prominently revolves around the ideas of Che Guevara. In the film, the character Babi Papuška, played by Danilo “Bata” Stojković, is searching for a real revolutionary society and a real revolution. The film opens and closes with Babi reciting a poem at rallies in Che’s honor.[53]
Leandro Katz’s 1997 film essay El Día Que Me Quieras (The Day You’ll Love Me) is a meditation on Freddy Alborta’s famous post-mortem photo of Che Guevara. Katz deconstructs and re-photographs the famous picture while drawing comparisons to the classic paintings of Mantegna’s “Dead Christ” and Rembrandt’s “The Anatomy Lesson”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Che_Guevara_in_popular_culture
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Cuban Revolution (Fidel Castro Raul Castro Che Guevara)

Cuba barack obama fidel castro raul Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba Cuba The Best Cuba Travel Guide on the Internet The True Story of Che Guevara The True Story of Che Guevara The True Story of Che Guevara Travel Guide on the Internet Travel Guide on the Internet

Travel to the country of Cuba with an American guy who ventures off into different neighborhoods of Havana. He interacts with the locals and engages in some casual conversation giving insight to just how polite the people of Cuba are.

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