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Merida MEX – Carriage 02
Cuba Culture
Image by Daniel Mennerich
Mérida is the capital of the Mexican state of Yucatán and largest city of the Yucatán Peninsula. It is located in the northwest part of the state, about 35 kilometres from the Gulf of Mexico coast. The city is also the municipal seat of the Municipality of Mérida, which includes the city and the areas around it.

According to the 2010 census, the population of Mérida was 970,377, ranking 12th among the most populous Mexican metropolitan areas. The municipality’s area is 858.41 km2. The metropolitan area includes the municipalities of Mérida, Umán and Kanasín and had a population of 1,035,238 in the same 2010 census. It is the largest of the four cities of the world that share the name Mérida, the other three being in Spain, Venezuela and The Philippines.

The city, like much of the state, has heavy Mayan, French, British and to a lesser extent Dutch influences. Mérida has the highest percentage of indigenous persons of any large city in Mexico with approximately 60% of all inhabitants being of the Maya ethnicity.

There were three Spanish conquistadors named "Francisco de Montejo": Francisco de Montejo "el Adelantado" ("The Lieutenant", the eldest); Francisco de Montejo y León "el Mozo" ("The Boy", his son); and Francisco de Montejo "el Sobrino" ("The Nephew"). Mérida was founded in 1542 by Francisco de Montejo y León ("el Mozo") and named after the town of Mérida in Extremadura, Spain. It was built on the site of the Maya city of T’hó, which was also called Ichkanzihóo or Ichcaanzihó "City of Five Hills" in reference to its pyramids. T’ho had been a center of Mayan culture and activity for centuries: because of this, some historians consider Mérida the oldest continually-occupied city in the Americas.

Carved Maya stones from ancient T’ho were widely used to build the Spanish colonial buildings that are plentiful in downtown Mérida, and are visible, for instance, in the walls of the main cathedral. Much of Mérida’s architecture from the colonial period through the 18th century and 19th century is still standing in the centro historico of the city. From colonial times through the mid-19th century, Mérida was a walled city intended to protect the Peninsular and Criollo residents from periodic revolts by the indigenous Maya. Several of the old Spanish city gates survive, but modern Mérida has expanded well beyond the old city walls.

Late in the 19th century and the early 20th Century, the area surrounding Mérida prospered from the production of henequén. For a brief period, around the turn of the 20th century, Mérida was said to house more millionaires than any other city in the world. The result of this concentration of wealth can still be seen today. Many large and elaborate homes still line the main avenue called Paseo de Montejo, though few are occupied today by individual families. Many of these homes have been restored and now serve as office buildings for banks and insurance companies.

Mérida has one of the largest centro histórico districts in the Americas (surpassed only by Mexico City and Havana, Cuba). Colonial homes line the city streets to this day, in various states of disrepair and renovation; the historical center of Mérida is currently undergoing a minor renaissance as more and more people are moving into the old buildings and reviving their former glory.

In August 1993, Pope John Paul II visited the city on his third trip to Mexico. The city has been host to two bilateral United States – Mexico conferences, the first in 1999 (Bill Clinton – Ernesto Zedillo) and the second in 2007 (George W. Bush – Felipe Calderón).

In June 2007, Mérida moved its city museum to the renovated Post Office building next to the downtown market. The Museum of the City of Mérida houses important artifacts from the city’s history, as well as an art gallery.

Merida MEX – Carriage 01
Cuba Culture
Image by Daniel Mennerich
Mérida is the capital of the Mexican state of Yucatán and largest city of the Yucatán Peninsula. It is located in the northwest part of the state, about 35 kilometres from the Gulf of Mexico coast. The city is also the municipal seat of the Municipality of Mérida, which includes the city and the areas around it.

According to the 2010 census, the population of Mérida was 970,377, ranking 12th among the most populous Mexican metropolitan areas. The municipality’s area is 858.41 km2. The metropolitan area includes the municipalities of Mérida, Umán and Kanasín and had a population of 1,035,238 in the same 2010 census. It is the largest of the four cities of the world that share the name Mérida, the other three being in Spain, Venezuela and The Philippines.

The city, like much of the state, has heavy Mayan, French, British and to a lesser extent Dutch influences. Mérida has the highest percentage of indigenous persons of any large city in Mexico with approximately 60% of all inhabitants being of the Maya ethnicity.

There were three Spanish conquistadors named "Francisco de Montejo": Francisco de Montejo "el Adelantado" ("The Lieutenant", the eldest); Francisco de Montejo y León "el Mozo" ("The Boy", his son); and Francisco de Montejo "el Sobrino" ("The Nephew"). Mérida was founded in 1542 by Francisco de Montejo y León ("el Mozo") and named after the town of Mérida in Extremadura, Spain. It was built on the site of the Maya city of T’hó, which was also called Ichkanzihóo or Ichcaanzihó "City of Five Hills" in reference to its pyramids. T’ho had been a center of Mayan culture and activity for centuries: because of this, some historians consider Mérida the oldest continually-occupied city in the Americas.

Carved Maya stones from ancient T’ho were widely used to build the Spanish colonial buildings that are plentiful in downtown Mérida, and are visible, for instance, in the walls of the main cathedral. Much of Mérida’s architecture from the colonial period through the 18th century and 19th century is still standing in the centro historico of the city. From colonial times through the mid-19th century, Mérida was a walled city intended to protect the Peninsular and Criollo residents from periodic revolts by the indigenous Maya. Several of the old Spanish city gates survive, but modern Mérida has expanded well beyond the old city walls.

Late in the 19th century and the early 20th Century, the area surrounding Mérida prospered from the production of henequén. For a brief period, around the turn of the 20th century, Mérida was said to house more millionaires than any other city in the world. The result of this concentration of wealth can still be seen today. Many large and elaborate homes still line the main avenue called Paseo de Montejo, though few are occupied today by individual families. Many of these homes have been restored and now serve as office buildings for banks and insurance companies.

Mérida has one of the largest centro histórico districts in the Americas (surpassed only by Mexico City and Havana, Cuba). Colonial homes line the city streets to this day, in various states of disrepair and renovation; the historical center of Mérida is currently undergoing a minor renaissance as more and more people are moving into the old buildings and reviving their former glory.

In August 1993, Pope John Paul II visited the city on his third trip to Mexico. The city has been host to two bilateral United States – Mexico conferences, the first in 1999 (Bill Clinton – Ernesto Zedillo) and the second in 2007 (George W. Bush – Felipe Calderón).

In June 2007, Mérida moved its city museum to the renovated Post Office building next to the downtown market. The Museum of the City of Mérida houses important artifacts from the city’s history, as well as an art gallery.

Cuban Book Fair, a Celebration of National Culture

Cuban Book Fair, a Celebration of National Culture
… important cultural event of this island in terms of participation. According to Vice President of the Cuban Book Institute Edel Morales the first stage of the event reached a high professional level as it gathered important personalities from the …
Read more on Prensa Latina

DPU students discover Cuban culture, healthcare in Winter Term course
DePauw University student Katie Rust held in her hand a sheet of paper filled with directions, guiding the students to find various unmarked buildings throughout Marianao, a municipality in Cuba's capital. While not fluent in Spanish and being …
Read more on The Banner-Graphic

Latest Cuban Culture Music News

Havana's New Beat: Electronic Music Is on the Rise in Cuba
Cuban culture remains carefully preserved and influential throughout the world, seeping through the embargo. But it also remains in many ways tied to another era, and electronic music is not part of the island's image, even as the genre's global …
Read more on THUMP (blog)

First U.S. Factory OK'd For Cuba Aims To Plow A Path Into 21st Century
When President Obama travels to Cuba next month — the first visit by a sitting U.S. president in nearly 90 years — it will mark a historic step on the path to normalizing relations with the island nation. While Obama is in Havana, two U.S …
Read more on WAMU 88.5

Cuban Allure, American Seduction exhibit to open at Wolfsonian-FIU
On the heels of renewed diplomatic relations and travel between the United States and Cuba, The Wolfsonian–FIU will explore images of pre-Revolution Cuban culture and the exotic in Promising Paradise: Cuban Allure, American Seduction, on view May 6 …
Read more on FIU News

Sandra Ramos incorporates political consciousness, Cuban culture with fantasy

Sandra Ramos incorporates political consciousness, Cuban culture with fantasy
With a mix of the whimsical and the political, Cuban artist Sandra Ramos brings the unique fantasy-nature of her work to the ASU Art Museum with the exhibit "Watertight: Sandra Ramos," that opened on Jan. 16. The exhibit follows Ramos' work with video …
Read more on The State Press

Fast & Furious, Fidel: US visitors flock to Cuban art spaces
Moves by art and culture travellers to reconnect with Cuba are far outpacing efforts to reopen business with America's former Cold War foe. While it could take years for congress to formally lift the trade embargo in place since the 1960s, artists and …
Read more on The Australian

NATIONAL CUBAN CULTURE DAY IN OTTAWA 25 OCTOBER 2013

The C.C.A.O.G organizing committee will be hosting the 145 Anniversaries of the Cuba’s National Culture Day and the 4th Annual of the Cuban Association, at the Ukrainian Banquet Hall.

Cuban Culture Day (el Dia de la Cultura Cubana) was instituted in commemoration of one of the most important events in the island’s history, the first singing on October 20, 1868 in the city of Bayamo of the national anthem, called The Bayamesa.
You can travel to Cuba!!! Or you can live the culture right here in Ottawa with over a thousand of your friends.

Latin Rhythms by: Jenny Sotolongo, Rino Montero, Yhasmany Martin, Moraima Rodriguez, Cesar Ricardo Band, Yanko Ballester, Timba 3 A Dance group, Danza Americas and many more
Social Dancing with DJ Alberto.

This year our main theme is “La Excelencia Cubana” (Cuban Excellence) for their 2013 achievement and outstanding presence. Please join us in making this another successful event.
To become one of our sponsor please check the sponsorship package link below:
CCAOG Sonsorship Package
http://laperlacubana-aog.com/145-cuban-culture-day-celebration/
THANK YOU YANKO BALLESTER!!
Video Rating: / 5

John Stehr takes a look at the culture that Cubans will try to preserve as their country and the U.S. enter a new relationship.

Cuba Travel: Amazing Culture, Beaches, Nature and Wildlife

Cuba Travel: Amazing Culture, Beaches, Nature and Wildlife

This travel video of Cuba provides some beautiful images from this exciting travel destination. The island nation of Cuba must be one of the most unique holiday destinations in the world. With its amazing nature and wildlife, beautiful beaches, rainforests, mountain ranges, waterfalls and vibrant cities, Cuba truly offers something for every traveler. The country feels like it has been in a time capsule for the last 50 years, with vintage American cars and horses and carts darting the streets of Havana. The city has a unique charm, and will appeal to any traveler interested in experiencing a rich culture filled with salsa rhythms, dancing, cocktails and cigars. The spectacular beaches and marine life offer endless relaxation and wonder with white sand, and warm, turquoise waters perfect for snorkeling and scuba diving. The conditions are also perfect for other water sports such as kite surfing, windsurfing and kayaking. This Caribbean gem should be on everyone’s must-visit list! I hope this video gives you some travel inspiration for your next holiday/vacation.

For more travel videos, please check out my channel:
www.youtube.com/c/coconutcompass

And for more travel inspiration and info visit our Coconut Compass Blog:
coconutcompass.com

Thanks for watching!

The Titusville Culture Report: Chaparral Mexican and Cuban Restaurant

Chris brings you the inside scoop on Titusville’s dining, fun and entertainment!

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Discover the vibrancy of contemporary Cuban culture @ www.havana-cultura.com

Havana Cultura is an initiative of Cuban rum maker Havana Club International S.A.

Track: “Ritmo sensorial”— Rukaiya Russell feat. Los Niches & Charly Mucha Rima. https://goo.gl/2EP8Ng
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Day of Cuban Culture, Saturday 22 October 2011

Audio from the Dia de la Cultura Cubana including interviews with Esther Armenteros, Cuban Ambassador, and Rob Miller, Cuba Solidarity Campaign Director. The event – attended by over 500 people – featured musicians including Omar Puente & Raices Cubanas and was organised by the Cuba Solidarity Campaign, CubArtista and the Cuban Embassy.

The audio track was produced by Rhianne Boland and Sam Lovell (www.connectlondonradio.co.uk) and the film includes photos from various Cuba-inspired events across London.

For more Cuban events in the UK please visit: www.cuba50.org or www.cuba-solidarity.org.uk
Video Rating: / 5